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Tag: In the News

More water woes – destroyed habitats

The Cawthron Institute employs over 200 people and has over 100 scientists employed. This institute could place six scientists in each Regional Council in New Zealand and still have a few left over. Do you know what? I was right there is another one. It is the Callahan Innovation with at times 422 employees, 200 scientists and you guessed it – all working diligently to build a ‘competitive and innovative economy’ for yours and my wellbeing. The Regional Councils in addition, employ their own scientific staff. In every organisation from top to bottom, to aid future development for the...

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The challenge was abstract

Creating an abstract image is always fun. We can use light, texture, lines, shapes and our creativity to make everyday objects seem otherworldly. ‘Bubblelicious’ by Kate Beauchamp won first place. A soft and dreamy macro image of oil on water. First: Kate Beauchamp Second: Rose Barrett Third: Anita Ruggle-Lussy Photo of the month was won by Bevan Walker with a well-timed image of a Brown Booby. The bird is well focussed and with the background blurred, it stands out showing all the detail of the feathers, webbed feet and that fantastic expression, a rare visitor to our Shores. First: Bevan...

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$1.8 million in prizes at the Kubota Classic

Richard Kibby, of Agri Life Hamilton; Andrew Welch, of Central Motors Hauraki Plains; Tom Maxwell, director of the tournament and Robyn Kirby, of R&R Tractors. In the driver’s seat on the Kubota U48G excavator is Ian Massicks, the Kubota Marketing Manager. The excavator was a lucky draw prize donated by the dealerships, worth $112,557. It was won by the team ‘Nirvana’. Champion Team prize This year two teams tied for second place Champions, each receiving $82,652. The Biggest Billfish prize – $350,000. The winning team caught the biggest marlin on the first night of fishing...

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Coro Club – good food at Coromandel Peninsula’s only airfield café

“State Highway 25a reopening early was fantastic, and the fine weather conditions this summer saw lots of aircraft landing in Whitianga as well as many locals coming to enjoy the sunshine of the deck area while eating lunch and catching up with friends. In addition to the variety of baked and prepared in-house meal, savouries, speciality sandwiches and pastries, Nick also backs his Swedish heritage. He is continuing to introduce Scandinavian dishes to the menu. Dishes like the Swedish Toast Skagen (Prawn Salad) are now firm favourites for regulars. “It’s awesome seeing people take a chance...

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Bin there, done that? Our recent recycling changes

The changes aim to encourage more recycling and reduce contamination by material that can’t be used. Monday, 18 March is Global Recycling Day. This is a quick run down on the dos and don’ts for recycling. Part One this week and Part two next week. What CAN be recycled: • Glass bottles and jars (Green Bin). As long as they are clean and don’t have lids. Lids are too small for the machinery at the recycling centre to sort and remove. NOT for green bin: Glass bottles and jars used for medicines, glass cookware, drinking glasses, mugs, plates, lightbulbs, window or broken glass. • Paper and cardboard...

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Some interesting boat names

In the days when long distance travel required boarding a boat, you might say, “I’m setting sail tomorrow on the Mayflower.” There’s only one Mayflower and everyone knew where to find it. Historically, boat crews were traditionally male. Captains knew the importance of creating an emotional bond between his ship and his crew, and the vessel a feminine name helped instill those feelings of connection. There always seems to be a story about how a boat got its name. There will be so many boats in Mercury Bay Harbour this coming weekend – over 490 of them, here to be part of the Kubota Classic,...

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Ron Cook and his life with horses around the world

Ron Cook – 86 years Part Two His Dad was a horse dealer and trainer and as far back as he can remember, Ron’s life and love has been horses. He started in the show ring when he was a nipper of five years. With great pleasure and pride, he would lead ponies around the show ring. It was in these events that he won his first blue ribbons. His Dad used to participate in three-day horse sales. These sales became the occasion for rodeo and calf roping. When he was sixteen, Ron was enthusiastically into rodeo and calf roping at the three-day sales and regional shows. The horses were usually provided...

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Ron Cook knows horses and equine gear well

86 years and still going strong. Ron grew up on a farm and horses were always there. His father trucked horses and was a horse dealer and blacksmith. Milking three cows before he rode to school on a pony was for Ron his normal life. It was only natural that Ron would slip into a life with horses and saddles and riding gear. He grew to love them and still does. Horse related chores, saddles and shoeing still occupies him from daylight to dusk. It’s his life and he loves it. His home in Whitianga is also part museum – walls  lined with photos and memorabilia of a life in showing horses and...

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Leave social services to Wellington

By delineating these roles clearly, TCDC can enhance efficiency, improve service delivery (reduce cost), and ensure better outcomes for us, the local fee and ratepayers. That way, we all avoid paying more than is required for services we need, value and are prepared to pay for. Local New Zealand government entities are pivotal in delivering essential services to communities. The extent of their responsibilities, particularly concerning social services, is debatable. As ratepayers and fee payers, we fund local government. As taxpayers, we fund central government. I advocate a change in focus...

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