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Marine

Some interesting boat names

Each of these names is proudly painted on a boat somewhere. She Got The Home, Time Out, Wind Breaker, Winning Ticket, In A Meeting, Pier Pressure, Vitamin Sea, Salty Test Tackles, Kids Inheritance, Knot For Sail, Knot 2 Bad, Fraid Knot.
 |  Ron morgan  | 

In the days when long distance travel required boarding a boat, you might say, “I’m setting sail tomorrow on the Mayflower.” There’s only one Mayflower and everyone knew where to find it.

Historically, boat crews were traditionally male. Captains knew the importance of creating an emotional bond between his ship and his crew, and the vessel a feminine name helped instill those feelings of connection.

There always seems to be a story about how a boat got its name. There will be so many boats in Mercury Bay Harbour this coming weekend – over 490 of them, here to be part of the Kubota Classic, the world’s largest Billfish competition and each boat has a story about how it got its name.

The naming of a new boat is therefore an exercise in itself. If you are stuck for a starting point, perhaps some of these suggestions may help?

Knot 2 Bad, Empty Pockets, Knot Stolen, Knot Working, Marlin Monroe, Passing Wind, Tax Sea-Vation, Nauti Buoy, Reality Bites, Costaplenty, Weather Oar Knot, Island Time, A Loan At Sea, Drama Free, My Reel Life, Berth Control, She Got The House, Fish and Ships, Reel Secrets, Liquid Assett, Breaking Wind, Gone With The Wind, Knot Dry, Knot Craz Sea, Good Vibrations, Happy Hour, Rodfather, Therapy.

Maori names

Cruising the marinas or viewing launches travelling or at a mooring can be interesting when analyzing the names shown.

Many vessels have beautiful Maori names which may assist in naming a boat  or interpreting a named boat.

Some could have a combination using these translations. Note there maybe local interpretations or variations to these interpretations by different iwi.

Awa –stream

Iti – small

Marino – calm

Moa – large

Ata – morning

Hinu – fat ,rich

Ki – full

Wai – water

Wera –hot

Nui – big

Waka –canoe

Tai – tide /the coast

Roa – long

Ao – cloud

Kara – beach

Kau – to swim

Tahi – one /single

Ma – stream

Mana – prestige

Tere – swift

Motu – island

Muri – breeze – the place of

Te – the

Papa – flat

Puke – hill

Rangi –sky

Roto – lakrua – two