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A significant first

On Wednesday afternoon,13 December, a large contingent of students from the roopu Hei 5 class and whanau assembled outside the Mercury Bay Area School Library for a Board of Trustees meeting at the School.

Historically, for a lot of māori students, appearing before a Board of Trustees meeting has not been a positive experience. However, in this case, this hui was to mark the first handing over of a Kakahu (evening cape) to celebrate the academic and cultural success of Hei 5 student, Kistarla Rawinia Foster. It was a very special Graduation for this young woman.

Ngati Hei Kaumatua,Joe Davis and Board of Trustees members got to hear from Kistarla herself about how she had achieved this honour. In a three-minute speech, Kistarla spoke about her trials and tribulations of achieving all five Poutama to attain this distinction. The Poutama were Whakatutuki (academic achievement), Hākinakina (sporting achievement), Manaakitanga (Service), Te Reo me onā Tikanga (achievement in te reo and tikanga māori), and Rangatiratanga (leadership). Each poutama had set points she needed to achieve. When asked by members of the Board which one was the hardest, she responded that she found the Hākinakina (sporting achievement) the most challenging. At the conclusion of her speech, the students and whanau from Hei 5 performed waiata and haka to celebrate Kistarla’s fine achievements.

Class teachers Matua Marcus Oxenham and Whaea Jo Kaaho were on hand to see Kistarla receive her Excellence Poutama from the Board. We both are extremely proud of Kistarla and her achievements, says teacher Matua Marcus Oxenham. The programme is a dedication to our mentor Matua Turoa “Duce” Pohatu who taught in the 90’s and early 2000’s at the Kura. His vision saw the establishment of the roopu reo class in the early 2000’s which now exists today. It is through his legacy that our students can now find pride to be themselves and attain academic and cultural success in our kura, says Oxenham. Also on hand to experience this occasion was Duce’s daughter, Kiri Kohu who spoke how proud she was of her father and how proud he would be to see his legacy still thriving in the Te Kura o Whitianga a Hei (Mercury Bay Area School). 

 |  The Informer  |  ,

On Wednesday afternoon,13 December, a large contingent of students from the roopu Hei 5 class and whanau assembled outside the Mercury Bay Area School Library for a Board of Trustees meeting at the School.

Historically, for a lot of māori students, appearing before a Board of Trustees meeting has not been a positive experience. However, in this case, this hui was to mark the first handing over of a Kakahu (evening cape) to celebrate the academic and cultural success of Hei 5 student, Kistarla Rawinia Foster. It was a very special Graduation for this young woman.

Ngati Hei Kaumatua,Joe Davis and Board of Trustees members got to hear from Kistarla herself about how she had achieved this honour. In a three-minute speech, Kistarla spoke about her trials and tribulations of achieving all five Poutama to attain this distinction. The Poutama were Whakatutuki (academic achievement), Hākinakina (sporting achievement), Manaakitanga (Service), Te Reo me onā Tikanga (achievement in te reo and tikanga māori), and Rangatiratanga (leadership). Each poutama had set points she needed to achieve. When asked by members of the Board which one was the hardest, she responded that she found the Hākinakina (sporting achievement) the most challenging. At the conclusion of her speech, the students and whanau from Hei 5 performed waiata and haka to celebrate Kistarla’s fine achievements.

Class teachers Matua Marcus Oxenham and Whaea Jo Kaaho were on hand to see Kistarla receive her Excellence Poutama from the Board. We both are extremely proud of Kistarla and her achievements, says teacher Matua Marcus Oxenham. The programme is a dedication to our mentor Matua Turoa “Duce” Pohatu who taught in the 90’s and early 2000’s at the Kura. His vision saw the establishment of the roopu reo class in the early 2000’s which now exists today. It is through his legacy that our students can now find pride to be themselves and attain academic and cultural success in our kura, says Oxenham. Also on hand to experience this occasion was Duce’s daughter, Kiri Kohu who spoke how proud she was of her father and how proud he would be to see his legacy still thriving in the Te Kura o Whitianga a Hei (Mercury Bay Area School).