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Environ­ment Archive



Jun 18, 2024
Environment

Community beachside building has to go

This week in Geraldton, West Australia, a Marine Rescue building which had been built in 2016 at the cost of $AU800,000, had to be demolished. The problem was high tides and beach erosion. At high tide, the water encroaches two metres from the structure. Last year, 2023, volunteers were out in force sand bagging the building – 2,000 bags. Their efforts were in vain and it was clear the building on that site was not viable. Residents with beachside properties in this same area face similar problems. It is expected that some of these homes may also have to go.

Jun 18, 2024
Environment

History of poisoning on the Coromandel Part Two

An explanation team was set up – an ever-expanding staff of scientists charged with finding the best way to spread 1080. They were based at “Landcare”. Later university professors jumped on the bandwagon and 1080 “experts” emerged from all of our universities. Their first challenge was to find an explanation for the dead native birds which was given to Eric Spurr. Eric did some “research”. His research showed that the poison would kill a lot of possums and rats which meant that the surviving birds would not be hassled by rats or possums come next breeding season so they would breed up so …

Jun 18, 2024
Environment

Let the facts be a part of the solution

The feather-like Caulerpa quickly smothers the sea floors. In January, a Tairua local, Will Fransen, was fishing solo out behind the Alderman Islands. Somehow he fell overboard and in little over 24 hours drifted in the currents to Mayor Island, over 55 km away. Incredibly for him and his family, he was found alive. If the currents and tides can carry a human this far, imagine the distance a small fragment of invasive seaweed can spread on the same currents, particularly because the tides and currents flow day in and day out. It may be easy to point the finger at boaties and blame vessel…

Jun 18, 2024
Environment

Water meters – some have them and some don’t

The key change is that everyone who has a meter will be charged on the basis of the amount of water they use. For a long time, instead of user payers, there has been a “fixed charge”. From 1 July 2024, that fixed charge will be reduced by about 50%. The other 50% will pay for the water treatment plant and process. The other portion of the charge which is no longer a fixed charge will be what you use. Water usage will be measured through existing meters. The new process commences 1 July. The cost per cubic metre is $1.62 for 1,000 litres. Comments from residents reveal confusion and conc…

Jun 11, 2024
Environment

Moving beyond throw-away cups

The move, driven by waste minimising trust Wāhi Tukurua, looks to phase out the plastic-lined take-away cups of which an estimated 250,000 end up in landfill each year from Mercury Bay alone. The cups, most of which appear to be cardboard, are not recyclable because of the plastic content and nearly all those which claim to be compostable, require a commercial composter not available in the Thames Coromandel region. Overflowing rubbish bins in Whitianga and surrounding streets in summer bear witness to the problem, with coffee cups a regular feature amongst the waste. Now the landfill tha…

Jun 11, 2024
Local Government

A CLOSE CALL FOR LOCAL CONTROL

Case in point is a recent emotional claim that local environment advocates “played a significant role in sinking the proposal put forth by Glen Leach for the Coromandel to obtain World Heritage status”. The claim was that the proposal’s failure is to be regretted. For the interest of many new residents, it was actually Waikato Regional Council (WRC), not upstart locals, that put a stop within weeks to a ‘hare-brained tourism scheme hatched in 2015 by then-Mayor Glenn Leach and Florida-based travel consultancy, Miles Marketing Destinations. A quick look at what was to be, shows why stopping…

Jun 11, 2024
Environment

History of poisoning on the Coromandel: Issue One

They imported the 1080 poison and made 1080-baits for spreading wherever they could find a “pest” to poison. The rabbit was the first victim and the 1080 bait factory got underway. The government made the baits and controlled their distribution through the rabbit boards and then regional councils. When the rabbits could absorb no more 1080, new “pests” were sought. That next “pest”, the one to really get this business off the ground, was the possum. The possum had first been imported to provide NZ with a fur industry but the government showed no interest in fur. The possums were left to th…

Jun 11, 2024
Environment

Planning your Treescape – Part 3

This is the third and final instalment of the series “Planning Your Treescape,” that aims to give you the information and ability to make informed decisions about tree planting on your land. Part One – Covered questions to contemplate before planting and how to determine availability of natural resources on your land. Part Two – Covered various environmental players in the long-term viability of a treescape. With that background information, we are now ready to talk specifics and suggest various species to consider when planning your treescape. With the dynamic weather on the Coromand…