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Bringing a revival to our homes

By Pauline Stewart

“The aesthetics of a person’s house are the first thing you see and you look for whether it has been restored to a high standard. It effects the architecture of your home,” says Inge.

“We look at homes everywhere we go, we look very carefully,” says Doug.

Doug and Inge Krause are speaking about looking at cedar.  They are a cedar restoring team. Their business is called Cedar Revival Ltd.,and they have recently moved to Whitianga to commence their business across the Coromandel Peninsula.

The Informer was pleased to meet with them after seeing cedar restoring occurring at what is a very attractive residence – No. 1 Jackman Road, right on the corner of Buffalo Beach Road. The house looked so good and finding out the reason, led to our catching up with this couple.

Doug has always worked with his hands. In 2009, he started working for Cedar Doctors. He loved it and felt so proud of the results he could achieve that would enable the cedar on people’s homes to last a long time and look beautiful. Eventually, Doug moved on to start his own company and has been working in Tauranga. The death of a family member led to Doug and Inge moving here to establish their business and build on their life together. 

Cedar is a popular outside feature on homes just now and the type of cedar used outdoors is the rough sawn cedar. Dress cedar is for inside the home. Doug works with both, but he is a particular specialist in the way outside cedar is treated and cared for. It is also his passion. “My passion is bringing ‘manky’ things to life. Cedar is a soft wood, not a hard wood,” says Doug.

“If you treat cedar properly from the beginning, your treatment will last 50 years. There is a consistent condition associated with new cedar – it is not coated with the concentration of coating that is needed to be enduring.  The new cedar has often not absorbed as much coating as it needs.  There are a few different coatings, but I prefer oil to stains and paints because oil treats the wood. It moisturises it. It is very receptive to oil treatment. Cedar is like your skin. The internal fibres are always expanding or contracting. Tomorrow it could be raining, and it is going to draw all the moisture in the cedar. Then it becomes hot again and so you get constant movement and unless it is treated in the right way to cope with that movement; recladding and reframing has to occur and that is very expensive.”

We asked Doug how difficult it is to restore cedar.

“There are three basic steps for restoring cedar,” says Doug. “Wash it, sand it and oil it.

But as simple as it sounds, there are lots of things to take into consideration. For example, sometimes the cedar has a laminate on it. The laminate is hard to remove – looks like paint stripper. That is what you need to get off.  It’s only once you start the process of cleaning it that you see the laminate’s effect. The soft wash chemicals do not take it out effectively. There are different processes within the washing. It’s crucial not to wash too hard because it furs. Then you have to sand everything and be so very careful. Washing has to remove all the contaminants. Laminate does not protect the cracks between the cedar boards.  It is the oil that provides the UV protection, laminate does not.

“We have seen people painting over their cedar,” says Inge. “This will eventually rot the timber, because the wood can’t breathe. Painting over cedar is simply a bad move.

A lot of kiwis like that silvered look with cedar. I like it too, but when you just leave it to get that effect, it is sometimes forgotten that the cedar is untreated. If left, the boards start cupping or scalloping, and the nails start to pop. The nails are copper, and the chemical composition of the nails reacts with the timber. Just putting more nails back is a temporary fix and enables the water to come in beneath the boards. Eventually you see black mould and splitting of the wood and the black mould has taken hold. The cleaning and stripping process then becomes vital. The main issue is how much chemical you use to extract the mould. Starting really light is best and slowly and carefully increase the chemicals.

“Coming back to the silver look, we can make it look however you want but the most important is the look needs to last and present beautifully..  We prioritise the education behind cedar and the treatment behind cedar.

The tint to give the silver look or any other look for that matter is done by adding the colour to the oil. With cedar, the colour changes. It needs time.  Give it three weeks or a month because the oil needs to dry and absorb properly before it shows its true colour.

If you like silver, we can make it silver, but through the oil rather than leaving it unprotected.

I wouldn’t put stain on an external cedar; but stains are not a bad thing – I would put a stain on a harder wood such as teak.

There is a plethora of houses all over the Coromandel with cedar that just need that care and careful attention, and I hope to restore and revive all of them,” smiles Doug.

At the very least I can offer them a weather-oriented programme of maintenance. Our homes are beside the ocean and a north facing home needs more treatment than a south facing home.

“Inge and I know we live in a beautiful place here in Whitianga and we hope to make people’s homes beautiful and lasting.” Email – doug@cedarrevival.co.nz

 |  The Informer  |  ,

By Pauline Stewart

“The aesthetics of a person’s house are the first thing you see and you look for whether it has been restored to a high standard. It effects the architecture of your home,” says Inge.

“We look at homes everywhere we go, we look very carefully,” says Doug.

Doug and Inge Krause are speaking about looking at cedar.  They are a cedar restoring team. Their business is called Cedar Revival Ltd.,and they have recently moved to Whitianga to commence their business across the Coromandel Peninsula.

The Informer was pleased to meet with them after seeing cedar restoring occurring at what is a very attractive residence – No. 1 Jackman Road, right on the corner of Buffalo Beach Road. The house looked so good and finding out the reason, led to our catching up with this couple.

Doug has always worked with his hands. In 2009, he started working for Cedar Doctors. He loved it and felt so proud of the results he could achieve that would enable the cedar on people’s homes to last a long time and look beautiful. Eventually, Doug moved on to start his own company and has been working in Tauranga. The death of a family member led to Doug and Inge moving here to establish their business and build on their life together. 

Cedar is a popular outside feature on homes just now and the type of cedar used outdoors is the rough sawn cedar. Dress cedar is for inside the home. Doug works with both, but he is a particular specialist in the way outside cedar is treated and cared for. It is also his passion. “My passion is bringing ‘manky’ things to life. Cedar is a soft wood, not a hard wood,” says Doug.

“If you treat cedar properly from the beginning, your treatment will last 50 years. There is a consistent condition associated with new cedar – it is not coated with the concentration of coating that is needed to be enduring.  The new cedar has often not absorbed as much coating as it needs.  There are a few different coatings, but I prefer oil to stains and paints because oil treats the wood. It moisturises it. It is very receptive to oil treatment. Cedar is like your skin. The internal fibres are always expanding or contracting. Tomorrow it could be raining, and it is going to draw all the moisture in the cedar. Then it becomes hot again and so you get constant movement and unless it is treated in the right way to cope with that movement; recladding and reframing has to occur and that is very expensive.”

We asked Doug how difficult it is to restore cedar.

“There are three basic steps for restoring cedar,” says Doug. “Wash it, sand it and oil it.

But as simple as it sounds, there are lots of things to take into consideration. For example, sometimes the cedar has a laminate on it. The laminate is hard to remove – looks like paint stripper. That is what you need to get off.  It’s only once you start the process of cleaning it that you see the laminate’s effect. The soft wash chemicals do not take it out effectively. There are different processes within the washing. It’s crucial not to wash too hard because it furs. Then you have to sand everything and be so very careful. Washing has to remove all the contaminants. Laminate does not protect the cracks between the cedar boards.  It is the oil that provides the UV protection, laminate does not.

“We have seen people painting over their cedar,” says Inge. “This will eventually rot the timber, because the wood can’t breathe. Painting over cedar is simply a bad move.

A lot of kiwis like that silvered look with cedar. I like it too, but when you just leave it to get that effect, it is sometimes forgotten that the cedar is untreated. If left, the boards start cupping or scalloping, and the nails start to pop. The nails are copper, and the chemical composition of the nails reacts with the timber. Just putting more nails back is a temporary fix and enables the water to come in beneath the boards. Eventually you see black mould and splitting of the wood and the black mould has taken hold. The cleaning and stripping process then becomes vital. The main issue is how much chemical you use to extract the mould. Starting really light is best and slowly and carefully increase the chemicals.

“Coming back to the silver look, we can make it look however you want but the most important is the look needs to last and present beautifully..  We prioritise the education behind cedar and the treatment behind cedar.

The tint to give the silver look or any other look for that matter is done by adding the colour to the oil. With cedar, the colour changes. It needs time.  Give it three weeks or a month because the oil needs to dry and absorb properly before it shows its true colour.

If you like silver, we can make it silver, but through the oil rather than leaving it unprotected.

I wouldn’t put stain on an external cedar; but stains are not a bad thing – I would put a stain on a harder wood such as teak.

There is a plethora of houses all over the Coromandel with cedar that just need that care and careful attention, and I hope to restore and revive all of them,” smiles Doug.

At the very least I can offer them a weather-oriented programme of maintenance. Our homes are beside the ocean and a north facing home needs more treatment than a south facing home.

“Inge and I know we live in a beautiful place here in Whitianga and we hope to make people’s homes beautiful and lasting.” Email – doug@cedarrevival.co.nz