Skip to main content

Travel and education – it’s our way.

Talking with 17 year old, Yu Kogi By Stan Stewart.

Yu is from Japan. In some ways it is not surprising that Yu chose to come to New Zealand to continue her education. Overseas study runs in the family. In Japan, her Mother is a concert hall manager and her Father is a lawyer. However, both of them grew up in Western countries, her mother in England the her Father in USA. Consequently, the thought of their daughter continuing her education in New Zealand seemed entirely natural to them.

Japanese school regime for teenagers is very strict. The focus is on study, not only at school, but also at home. Teenage life as we know it in western countries doesn’t happen; there is no time for it. There are strict dress codes and adornments which are everyday items here, such as earrings, but are not permitted for students in Japan. Yu was finding her school life to be a great burden. It did not fit her capacity or her interests. In her heart she was crying out for another education system with a balance between study and the social life of a teenager. Her parents understood her need and after investigation, Evakona in New Zealand seemed to be the right fit. And that’s the way it is working out.

Prior to making the commitment, her parents investigated life in New Zealand. They could see that it was a beautiful country with a strong emphasis on nature and the environment. The fact there is a stable government and absence of terrorists and violent unrest convinced them that New Zealand would be the right destination for Yu.

Evakona has students from various parts of Japan. As far as Yu is concerned, this is a plus. While in New Zealand she hopes to also meet students from South America and Asia. The idea of cultures learning from each other appeals to Yu. She wants to have a multi-race and multi-culture view of the world. This is a future she would like to see.

The teachers and kiwi adults she has interacted with have all been very friendly. Classes in Evakona are small and this enables the students to receive personal attention. What has impressed Yu has been the kindness and friendliness of her teachers and everyone she has met. She feels very much at home with her kind and thoughtful homestay parent.

Life here in New Zealand has been more relaxed than typical teenage life in Japan. She has had a range of new experiences, such as sleeping in a tent. Another thing that has impressed her has been the stars. “There are so many of them and they are so bright,” she says. In Japan the lights of the cities dull the night sky and the stars are hard to see.

After a year at Evakona, Yu will move to Tauranga where she will attend a normal high school. Once again, a suitable homestay will be waiting to welcome her. As to her future, Yu is thinking of University, possibly in New Zealand and a career in science or health.

Go well Yu. We are glad you have come to our town.

 

Caption: Yu Kogi.

 |  The Informer  | 
Talking with 17 year old, Yu Kogi By Stan Stewart.

Yu is from Japan. In some ways it is not surprising that Yu chose to come to New Zealand to continue her education. Overseas study runs in the family. In Japan, her Mother is a concert hall manager and her Father is a lawyer. However, both of them grew up in Western countries, her mother in England the her Father in USA. Consequently, the thought of their daughter continuing her education in New Zealand seemed entirely natural to them.

Japanese school regime for teenagers is very strict. The focus is on study, not only at school, but also at home. Teenage life as we know it in western countries doesn’t happen; there is no time for it. There are strict dress codes and adornments which are everyday items here, such as earrings, but are not permitted for students in Japan. Yu was finding her school life to be a great burden. It did not fit her capacity or her interests. In her heart she was crying out for another education system with a balance between study and the social life of a teenager. Her parents understood her need and after investigation, Evakona in New Zealand seemed to be the right fit. And that’s the way it is working out.

Prior to making the commitment, her parents investigated life in New Zealand. They could see that it was a beautiful country with a strong emphasis on nature and the environment. The fact there is a stable government and absence of terrorists and violent unrest convinced them that New Zealand would be the right destination for Yu.

Evakona has students from various parts of Japan. As far as Yu is concerned, this is a plus. While in New Zealand she hopes to also meet students from South America and Asia. The idea of cultures learning from each other appeals to Yu. She wants to have a multi-race and multi-culture view of the world. This is a future she would like to see.

The teachers and kiwi adults she has interacted with have all been very friendly. Classes in Evakona are small and this enables the students to receive personal attention. What has impressed Yu has been the kindness and friendliness of her teachers and everyone she has met. She feels very much at home with her kind and thoughtful homestay parent.

Life here in New Zealand has been more relaxed than typical teenage life in Japan. She has had a range of new experiences, such as sleeping in a tent. Another thing that has impressed her has been the stars. “There are so many of them and they are so bright,” she says. In Japan the lights of the cities dull the night sky and the stars are hard to see.

After a year at Evakona, Yu will move to Tauranga where she will attend a normal high school. Once again, a suitable homestay will be waiting to welcome her. As to her future, Yu is thinking of University, possibly in New Zealand and a career in science or health.

Go well Yu. We are glad you have come to our town.

 

Caption: Yu Kogi.