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TCDC SPEAKSABOUT OUR RUBBISH BINS

Our Council’s new kerbside rubbish, recycling and food waste collections have been in place

since Friday 1 September, serving 27,000 customers across the district.

In November, 1,285 red-lidded wheelie bins for rubbish were not emptied, either because no Pay As You Th row (PAYT) tag was attached to the bin, or attached incorrectly. Th is is a tiny proportion of the number of successful rubbish collections that month. For the most part, people using our rubbish collection service are attaching the tags correctly and only a small number are still having issues.

We welcome calls to our 24/7 customer service line about our service, which we are always trying to improve. We’ve now put in place a process to make sure customers are replied to more quickly when they contact us over missed collections and more information becomes available.

Th ere was an initial grace period of almost two months for customers to get used to the new PAYT system. Since 30 October if no tag is attached, or attached incorrectly, then the bin won’t be emptied.

Th ere has been an extensive education campaign to explain how it works. Th e new bins for rubbish and food waste were delivered with a pamphlet explaining how to use them. Council also had demonstration bins (with affixed tags) in our service centres, so people can have a look to see

how it works and chat with our customer services team. We had a rollout roadshow in July connecting with customers about the new system where over 1,000 customers came to talk to the education representatives.

We will also have another roadshow for educating customers in January. Th ere is extensive information on our website about the kerbside service and how we are working to reduce the amount of waste going to landfill: www.tcdc.govt.nz/rubbish.

Th e tags are called Pay As You Th row (PAYT) tags to indicate that you only pay for rubbish you want collected. Th row less material out, pay less to have it collected. Th e purchase of tags helps fund the rubbish collection service, in much the same way that the purchase of the old blue

bags did. We’ve got far less single-use plastic going into landfill now.

Th e PAYT tags must be threaded through both the black handle on the side of the bin and the red handle on the lid and pulled through the tag and locked into place. Th ere are instructions on the tag.

Th e technology to have bins scanned upon emptying and then invoicing customers, instead of using pre-paid tags, will likely be available at some point but is not viable for our Council to use at the moment.

 |  The Informer  | 

Our Council’s new kerbside rubbish, recycling and food waste collections have been in place

since Friday 1 September, serving 27,000 customers across the district.

In November, 1,285 red-lidded wheelie bins for rubbish were not emptied, either because no Pay As You Th row (PAYT) tag was attached to the bin, or attached incorrectly. Th is is a tiny proportion of the number of successful rubbish collections that month. For the most part, people using our rubbish collection service are attaching the tags correctly and only a small number are still having issues.

We welcome calls to our 24/7 customer service line about our service, which we are always trying to improve. We’ve now put in place a process to make sure customers are replied to more quickly when they contact us over missed collections and more information becomes available.

Th ere was an initial grace period of almost two months for customers to get used to the new PAYT system. Since 30 October if no tag is attached, or attached incorrectly, then the bin won’t be emptied.

Th ere has been an extensive education campaign to explain how it works. Th e new bins for rubbish and food waste were delivered with a pamphlet explaining how to use them. Council also had demonstration bins (with affixed tags) in our service centres, so people can have a look to see

how it works and chat with our customer services team. We had a rollout roadshow in July connecting with customers about the new system where over 1,000 customers came to talk to the education representatives.

We will also have another roadshow for educating customers in January. Th ere is extensive information on our website about the kerbside service and how we are working to reduce the amount of waste going to landfill: www.tcdc.govt.nz/rubbish.

Th e tags are called Pay As You Th row (PAYT) tags to indicate that you only pay for rubbish you want collected. Th row less material out, pay less to have it collected. Th e purchase of tags helps fund the rubbish collection service, in much the same way that the purchase of the old blue

bags did. We’ve got far less single-use plastic going into landfill now.

Th e PAYT tags must be threaded through both the black handle on the side of the bin and the red handle on the lid and pulled through the tag and locked into place. Th ere are instructions on the tag.

Th e technology to have bins scanned upon emptying and then invoicing customers, instead of using pre-paid tags, will likely be available at some point but is not viable for our Council to use at the moment.