Skip to main content

@theinformernz


Real Estate – the people behind the names

REAL ESTATE is a significant partner with the economy of the Coromandel Peninsula . There is not an adult who does not think about and rely on land values and housing – what we can afford, what will be our home, our dreams for the future and long term security.

The leaders of our Real Estate businesses are therefore very important.

The Informer decided to let our readers meet the people behind the brand names – who they are, their background, what are their dreams for the future.

We have started with Dayle Candy of Harcourts and Shaun Paterson of Bayleys, part of larger franchises across the country. Next issue will feature John Hunt of North Real Estate and Rob Ball, followed by Richardsons and Ray White.

It would be our hope that the owners and leaders of every business in Mercury Bay become known to the community.

Pauline Stewart – Editor

 

Dayle Erica Candy is the Business Owner and Executive Officer of Harcourts Real Estate in Whitianga. Her partner Dave is CEO. Before Real Estate, Dayle had 26 years in the police force and nine years running a children’s education resources business.

 

“When we had the opportunity to go into the Real Estate business in Whitianga, the passion to be successful became realising the potential in other people. When you buy a business in a provincial town you get the opportunity to apply your own principles to that business.

I don’t want to just say what people want to hear. However, I don’t just say what I think. I want to see what the response from the other persons is first. I’m still learning and I don’t want to be put in a box. What I thought in my twenties is not what I think now. I don’t want to stand on ceremony so much any more. I am intuitive and these days I trust my intuition more. Throughout my life, I would know the answer to something and would not know how I got the answer but I knew I had the answer or the solution. These days I trust myself more.

If I had a chance at a new vocation, I would like to try law; not the police but the law. My father said I would just have family and so formal education in law would be useless. I have been able to overcome those prejudices.

When I think about the challenges I have faced, there have been low times but never as low as when I was in the police force. That was an extremely difficult time towards the end of the 26 years.

The disappointment in my superiors was really hard to take. I felt as if I had lost a lifetime.

We left the police force and bought a retail business. It was an expensive investment involving selling educational stories. We ran a good business and we were definitely on a winner. We had something significant for children . We learned a lot about child development and education tools and we both knew we wanted independence as income earners. We believed it was much better than buying toys from China. We worked a lot wth preschools and our philosophy was wholistic. But we had to let it go in 2009. There was nothing else as disappointing as that. People didn’t have disposable income at that time. We had to lose the dream.

 

At the same time, we told ourselves that you just have to keep on with something. When I was working as a detective, I remember a case that played out for three years. You need to keep believing and also help people keep believing, that justice has a long arm and that in the end it’s worth trusting and it’s worth looking after people, making sure the right thing is done. I achieve more for people when I give more, even though, in that, there is a risk.

 
 

Mentoring: “When I joined the police, the environment. In the early 90’s, was to develop people to a high level of their satisfaction. There was a lot of education around developing people, irrelevant of race or gender. Mentoring a person to be their best was a strong focus. It is like caring for family. I loved investigative work, I was thankful for all the provisions around maternity leave. The problem came as the children got older and I was asked to work harder and longer. The 1970’s attitude returned. There were people in power who had a different understanding of mentoring and leadership, and who tried to get rid of those who did not fit. That was very disillusioning and did not suit the future that I wanted to build; there was no place for me. The hours were gruelling. We had four children. My partner was also in the police, and it became a decision around health and family. I was young enough to believe I could start again. My father had done a restart in his career at 26 after a farming accident. He went into sales, and at 44 went from working for an employer to working for himself. My parents retired at 74 and 76 respectively. Their example has effected me.”

 

Leading from the front: “ Hopefully, you take your learnings with you. I learned from policing that you need to lead from the front. In Harcourts, it’s important to be that kind of example. The hardest aspect of coming to Whitianga was being accepted. We were new in town. We weren’t necessarily liked when we came here but we have earned respect with the people with whom we work. Policing gave me the strength to forge on. The journey is way more enjoyable now than it was in the beginning. We have a young group and we are developing them as well as letting the older ones know that we can be relied upon to give good advice and encouragement. We encourage training at every level and do this in lots of different ways. I am very fortunate in that my partner is my husband. We speak the same language. He is different but we are a good team I would not be here without Dave. We have to be on the same page at the same time. “

 

The future: “I have been gifted by my parents with the ability and desire to work hard, and I have been passionate about everything I have done. I was passionate about bringing justice in the police force – justice for victims. I loved working with the children’s educational toys and resources. In real estate, it is no different. We provide a service. We help people out in a difficult situation and we guide them to make the right decisions out of sometimes, very difficult options. I want to look after people.

I think I am good at Real Estate, and I am good at Real Estate in this town, but I don’t want to burn out. I want to be respective regarding my age. Everyone still needs a purpose and you don’t need to lose resourcefulness or your spirit with age. That’s why I love to train people. They can pick up on it.

In our company here, we developed the rising star for the whole of Harcourts in New Zealand.

Someone from Harcourts won that – Adam Fuller (in his thirties ) won the rising star for the whole of the country. My next goal is to develop the next one.

Dayle smiles, “Another goal is being fit enough and wealthy enough to be available to our children when they have children. They are whom I am closest to and I promise to not say what I think first.”

 |  The Informer  | 

REAL ESTATE is a significant partner with the economy of the Coromandel Peninsula . There is not an adult who does not think about and rely on land values and housing – what we can afford, what will be our home, our dreams for the future and long term security.

The leaders of our Real Estate businesses are therefore very important.

The Informer decided to let our readers meet the people behind the brand names – who they are, their background, what are their dreams for the future.

We have started with Dayle Candy of Harcourts and Shaun Paterson of Bayleys, part of larger franchises across the country. Next issue will feature John Hunt of North Real Estate and Rob Ball, followed by Richardsons and Ray White.

It would be our hope that the owners and leaders of every business in Mercury Bay become known to the community.

Pauline Stewart – Editor

 

Dayle Erica Candy is the Business Owner and Executive Officer of Harcourts Real Estate in Whitianga. Her partner Dave is CEO. Before Real Estate, Dayle had 26 years in the police force and nine years running a children’s education resources business.

 

“When we had the opportunity to go into the Real Estate business in Whitianga, the passion to be successful became realising the potential in other people. When you buy a business in a provincial town you get the opportunity to apply your own principles to that business.

I don’t want to just say what people want to hear. However, I don’t just say what I think. I want to see what the response from the other persons is first. I’m still learning and I don’t want to be put in a box. What I thought in my twenties is not what I think now. I don’t want to stand on ceremony so much any more. I am intuitive and these days I trust my intuition more. Throughout my life, I would know the answer to something and would not know how I got the answer but I knew I had the answer or the solution. These days I trust myself more.

If I had a chance at a new vocation, I would like to try law; not the police but the law. My father said I would just have family and so formal education in law would be useless. I have been able to overcome those prejudices.

When I think about the challenges I have faced, there have been low times but never as low as when I was in the police force. That was an extremely difficult time towards the end of the 26 years.

The disappointment in my superiors was really hard to take. I felt as if I had lost a lifetime.

We left the police force and bought a retail business. It was an expensive investment involving selling educational stories. We ran a good business and we were definitely on a winner. We had something significant for children . We learned a lot about child development and education tools and we both knew we wanted independence as income earners. We believed it was much better than buying toys from China. We worked a lot wth preschools and our philosophy was wholistic. But we had to let it go in 2009. There was nothing else as disappointing as that. People didn’t have disposable income at that time. We had to lose the dream.

 

At the same time, we told ourselves that you just have to keep on with something. When I was working as a detective, I remember a case that played out for three years. You need to keep believing and also help people keep believing, that justice has a long arm and that in the end it’s worth trusting and it’s worth looking after people, making sure the right thing is done. I achieve more for people when I give more, even though, in that, there is a risk.

 
 

Mentoring: “When I joined the police, the environment. In the early 90’s, was to develop people to a high level of their satisfaction. There was a lot of education around developing people, irrelevant of race or gender. Mentoring a person to be their best was a strong focus. It is like caring for family. I loved investigative work, I was thankful for all the provisions around maternity leave. The problem came as the children got older and I was asked to work harder and longer. The 1970’s attitude returned. There were people in power who had a different understanding of mentoring and leadership, and who tried to get rid of those who did not fit. That was very disillusioning and did not suit the future that I wanted to build; there was no place for me. The hours were gruelling. We had four children. My partner was also in the police, and it became a decision around health and family. I was young enough to believe I could start again. My father had done a restart in his career at 26 after a farming accident. He went into sales, and at 44 went from working for an employer to working for himself. My parents retired at 74 and 76 respectively. Their example has effected me.”

 

Leading from the front: “ Hopefully, you take your learnings with you. I learned from policing that you need to lead from the front. In Harcourts, it’s important to be that kind of example. The hardest aspect of coming to Whitianga was being accepted. We were new in town. We weren’t necessarily liked when we came here but we have earned respect with the people with whom we work. Policing gave me the strength to forge on. The journey is way more enjoyable now than it was in the beginning. We have a young group and we are developing them as well as letting the older ones know that we can be relied upon to give good advice and encouragement. We encourage training at every level and do this in lots of different ways. I am very fortunate in that my partner is my husband. We speak the same language. He is different but we are a good team I would not be here without Dave. We have to be on the same page at the same time. “

 

The future: “I have been gifted by my parents with the ability and desire to work hard, and I have been passionate about everything I have done. I was passionate about bringing justice in the police force – justice for victims. I loved working with the children’s educational toys and resources. In real estate, it is no different. We provide a service. We help people out in a difficult situation and we guide them to make the right decisions out of sometimes, very difficult options. I want to look after people.

I think I am good at Real Estate, and I am good at Real Estate in this town, but I don’t want to burn out. I want to be respective regarding my age. Everyone still needs a purpose and you don’t need to lose resourcefulness or your spirit with age. That’s why I love to train people. They can pick up on it.

In our company here, we developed the rising star for the whole of Harcourts in New Zealand.

Someone from Harcourts won that – Adam Fuller (in his thirties ) won the rising star for the whole of the country. My next goal is to develop the next one.

Dayle smiles, “Another goal is being fit enough and wealthy enough to be available to our children when they have children. They are whom I am closest to and I promise to not say what I think first.”