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Letters to the Editor

Sterling work

I felt privileged to attend the showing of the film ‘Twelve Days-1769’ at the Mercury Twin Cinemas a couple of weeks ago. This was well attended thanks to publicity by both the Informer and the MB Historical Society at its latest coffee morning. What was missing in the Informer article and also at the screening was acknowledgment of the huge contribution of the Informer’s Stan and Pauline Stewart.

Our community owes sincere thanks to Stan for his sterling work in researching and producing this film in the late 1990’s along with Pauline assisting with the research. Stan made this documentary of Lieutenant James Cook’s adventures over the twelve days in Mercury Bay, with the help of knowledgeable locals including Joe Davis of Ngati Hei. It’s a great film featuring many local identities as actors.

I would like to express my thanks to the Mercury Bay Museum for arranging the digitising of Stan’s original video. For years the video was shown to school groups at the Museum, but it fell victim to new technology. Now digitised, this very professional and important film has been given a new lease of life. The audience loved it and so did I. Hopefully we will all be able to purchase copies of the new digitised version at the Museum just as we could in the past for the old VHS one which was a nice fundraiser for the museum.

Alastair Brickell

Chairman, Mercury Bay Historical Society

Interesting letters

Interesting to read all the letters to the editor and the opinions you printed, well done. I was going to reply to one but thought it better to just remind everyone that it was Pakeha that claimed ownership of Te Whenua not Māori, so Māori had to as well otherwise they might have none, and a treaty was signed with the Crown.

Noho Ora Mai na

Kelvin Mouritsen

Port Jackson

No Doctor

Biggest news up here is Doctor resigned so no Doctor for us all at the mo. Big blow to the community and hopefully the clinic won’t have to close. Cheers.

Kelvin Mouritsen Port Jackson

 |  The Informer  | 

Sterling work

I felt privileged to attend the showing of the film ‘Twelve Days-1769’ at the Mercury Twin Cinemas a couple of weeks ago. This was well attended thanks to publicity by both the Informer and the MB Historical Society at its latest coffee morning. What was missing in the Informer article and also at the screening was acknowledgment of the huge contribution of the Informer’s Stan and Pauline Stewart.

Our community owes sincere thanks to Stan for his sterling work in researching and producing this film in the late 1990’s along with Pauline assisting with the research. Stan made this documentary of Lieutenant James Cook’s adventures over the twelve days in Mercury Bay, with the help of knowledgeable locals including Joe Davis of Ngati Hei. It’s a great film featuring many local identities as actors.

I would like to express my thanks to the Mercury Bay Museum for arranging the digitising of Stan’s original video. For years the video was shown to school groups at the Museum, but it fell victim to new technology. Now digitised, this very professional and important film has been given a new lease of life. The audience loved it and so did I. Hopefully we will all be able to purchase copies of the new digitised version at the Museum just as we could in the past for the old VHS one which was a nice fundraiser for the museum.

Alastair Brickell

Chairman, Mercury Bay Historical Society

Interesting letters

Interesting to read all the letters to the editor and the opinions you printed, well done. I was going to reply to one but thought it better to just remind everyone that it was Pakeha that claimed ownership of Te Whenua not Māori, so Māori had to as well otherwise they might have none, and a treaty was signed with the Crown.

Noho Ora Mai na

Kelvin Mouritsen

Port Jackson

No Doctor

Biggest news up here is Doctor resigned so no Doctor for us all at the mo. Big blow to the community and hopefully the clinic won’t have to close. Cheers.

Kelvin Mouritsen Port Jackson