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from Mayor Len

Extract from Mayor Len’s letter to the Thames-Coromandel constituents, Friday 17 February

On Wednesday, I stood in the EOC operations centre with Transport Minister Michael Wood and watched as Civil Defence Controller Garry Towler led his team of 150 personnel from around the district through the morning briefing. I’ve never been more proud of our people, or more grateful for their selfless contributions.

…our hearts go out to the people of Tairāwhiti, Napier, Wairoa, Hastings and all of the other districts that have been hit so hard. I’ve reached out to the Mayors in these districts to see how we can help them. They did the same for us when Cyclone Gabrielle was upon us.

Cyclone Gabrielle has been tough for everybody in our district. It followed five weeks of severe storm events and record-breaking rain. Our emergency roading budget was wiped out in the November storm. We’re now using retained earnings to pay for roading repairs. We’ve still got four months to go before the end of the financial year and the well is running dry. That’s the stark reality of our situation. We’ve urged the Government for urgent assistance with the roading subsidy and support on many other levels.

The impact on our roading and infrastructure has been severe and we continue to work through that. We’re resourceful people in the Coromandel, but the longer-term effects are what have our Council concerned. Central government needs to commit to a huge investment into our roading resilience and infrastructure capabilities, on a scale never seen before.

This is now a critical conversation which goes to the heart of our economic and social well-being as a community. And it has to be an “all party” commitment. Politicians from all sides need to commit to making the investments in our communities, and to working together to make it happen. Any politician who isn’t prepared to make that commitment isn’t welcome in my office. Our economic and social well-being depends on reliable access to services and amenities. We have had three cabinet ministers visit in the last three weeks, and that message has been relayed to the government in the strongest possible terms.

The first funds have already arrived in our Mayoral Relief Fund (See page 16 of this Issue). The real support needed will be tens of millions in the short-term and hundreds of millions in the long-term as we manage the effects of climate change. Our Council started work on this three years ago with the Shoreline Management Plan programme. We ramped up the urgency in the week before Cyclone Hale, and with each passing week the need for long-term solutions has become more evident and more urgent.

This is going to be a long journey, with some difficult conversations and decisions along the way. We’re in this together, and there’s never been a more important need for that spirit of Coromandel resilience and support for each other to continue. Thank you.”

Caption: From left, Waka Kotahi Director Regional Relationships David Speirs and Thames Coromandel District Mayor, Len Salt.

 |  The Informer  | 

Extract from Mayor Len’s letter to the Thames-Coromandel constituents, Friday 17 February

On Wednesday, I stood in the EOC operations centre with Transport Minister Michael Wood and watched as Civil Defence Controller Garry Towler led his team of 150 personnel from around the district through the morning briefing. I’ve never been more proud of our people, or more grateful for their selfless contributions.

…our hearts go out to the people of Tairāwhiti, Napier, Wairoa, Hastings and all of the other districts that have been hit so hard. I’ve reached out to the Mayors in these districts to see how we can help them. They did the same for us when Cyclone Gabrielle was upon us.

Cyclone Gabrielle has been tough for everybody in our district. It followed five weeks of severe storm events and record-breaking rain. Our emergency roading budget was wiped out in the November storm. We’re now using retained earnings to pay for roading repairs. We’ve still got four months to go before the end of the financial year and the well is running dry. That’s the stark reality of our situation. We’ve urged the Government for urgent assistance with the roading subsidy and support on many other levels.

The impact on our roading and infrastructure has been severe and we continue to work through that. We’re resourceful people in the Coromandel, but the longer-term effects are what have our Council concerned. Central government needs to commit to a huge investment into our roading resilience and infrastructure capabilities, on a scale never seen before.

This is now a critical conversation which goes to the heart of our economic and social well-being as a community. And it has to be an “all party” commitment. Politicians from all sides need to commit to making the investments in our communities, and to working together to make it happen. Any politician who isn’t prepared to make that commitment isn’t welcome in my office. Our economic and social well-being depends on reliable access to services and amenities. We have had three cabinet ministers visit in the last three weeks, and that message has been relayed to the government in the strongest possible terms.

The first funds have already arrived in our Mayoral Relief Fund (See page 16 of this Issue). The real support needed will be tens of millions in the short-term and hundreds of millions in the long-term as we manage the effects of climate change. Our Council started work on this three years ago with the Shoreline Management Plan programme. We ramped up the urgency in the week before Cyclone Hale, and with each passing week the need for long-term solutions has become more evident and more urgent.

This is going to be a long journey, with some difficult conversations and decisions along the way. We’re in this together, and there’s never been a more important need for that spirit of Coromandel resilience and support for each other to continue. Thank you.”

Caption: From left, Waka Kotahi Director Regional Relationships David Speirs and Thames Coromandel District Mayor, Len Salt.