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For the love of the environment – MBAS students shine

The Year 3-4 team at Mercury Bay Area School have been looking at Respecting the Environment this past term. The five classes of seven – eight- and nine-year-olds went out and collected rubbish in the area around their Kura and the Robinson Road beachfront reserve areas. They were very thorough with the amount of rubbish they collected and the way they sorted it.

ROOM 32 – Mrs Marie Bevan

As part of their learning, some classes made sculptures using the recycled material they collected, others made art (jellyfish mobiles from items they found; others took photos of the waste. All were fired up about their view of what they were doing. The teacher worked with their enthusiasm and encouraged everyone to contribute to the reporting. Recall and ability to recount was high functioning.

 

ROOM 33 – Whaea Bex

We realised we create a lot of soft plastic, more then we thought. So, our room started a project to collect all the soft plastic from all five of our classes. So, every call has a receptacle ad we organise that.

Anuhea – I was getting the rubbish as a way to help the animals.

Minnie – It was satisfying getting the rubbish that was stuck in bushes and branches.

Emily – Sorting it was good because then we could figure out how much could be recycled.

Jasper – We painted rocks with messages about keeping places tidy and left the for people to find; that was fun.

Don M – We hid our painted rocks where we had found rubbish. When people find them and read them, they’ll stop littering.

Emelia – Someone found a shoe, socks and a rugby ball.

Jai – some people are too lazy to put it in the rubbish bin.

Ariki – Some animals eat the plastic. The sea gulls pick at the rubbish. It goes into their stomachs, and they can starve.

Emily – That plastic comes from oil.

 

ROOM 30 – Miss Marra

This room covered the Lovers Rock area in their clean-up. The children listed what they had found – a stash of cans, a full bottle of wine, old metal fence Waratah, a bottle with an ants nest in it, a padlock, an old food freezer stacked with rubbish several bags of dog poo in a tree; all the same bags, left by one person putting them there regularly, a dead bird in a plastic bag;

Comments from the children about the project

There was just more rubbish than I thought.

People can’t be bothered and don’t want to use their pockets.

Some don’t care where they put stuff.

You know, some ends up in the ocean.

People don’t realise how much pollution they are causing.

A family might just want to get home.

 

ROOM M5 – Mrs Rebecca Berry

This classroom started with the word RESPECT and explored its meaning in many dimensions – what if feels like, what it sounds like, what it looks like.

They started with the way we show respect for others – all ages ad developed the transference of this understanding to the respect for the environment.

We had to figure out what we wanted to make and then we wen through the rubbish to choose what we needed.

“We had to draw our concept first and refine it int a design,” says Rebecca their teacher. One of the boys, Cooper, made a rocket, using an empty lemonade bottle, a twist of paper and some very good timing.

Their class project was formidable.

This class had an ironing board and a sewing machine at the back for of their classroom. The students had used both to make their recycled carry bags – compressing pieces of plastic rubbish under wax paper with the iron (some of the plastic melts or disintegrates, melding all parts into a hardy sheet), then sewing the sheets to make a bag – easier said than done. All the steps they devised were set out clearly, making things as easy as possible.

The Informer was so impressed that we purchased one for carrying our newspapers when filling the newsstands in the street.

 

Editor’s note: I visited four classrooms. I wanted to stay longer with each one. I have always measured happiness by the level of their engagement, the way they relate toon another, their wanting to listen and to participate. These children were bursting with goodwill and information. The teachers are doing a great work. Congratulations! And to be sure, there are parents putting a lot of effort and love into their children’s hearts and minds to assist their education. The Informer was grateful to Marie Bevan for the invitation to share in the results of the term project of the Year Three – Four classes at MBAS – Primary School age group.

 |  The Informer  | 

The Year 3-4 team at Mercury Bay Area School have been looking at Respecting the Environment this past term. The five classes of seven – eight- and nine-year-olds went out and collected rubbish in the area around their Kura and the Robinson Road beachfront reserve areas. They were very thorough with the amount of rubbish they collected and the way they sorted it.

ROOM 32 – Mrs Marie Bevan

As part of their learning, some classes made sculptures using the recycled material they collected, others made art (jellyfish mobiles from items they found; others took photos of the waste. All were fired up about their view of what they were doing. The teacher worked with their enthusiasm and encouraged everyone to contribute to the reporting. Recall and ability to recount was high functioning.

 

ROOM 33 – Whaea Bex

We realised we create a lot of soft plastic, more then we thought. So, our room started a project to collect all the soft plastic from all five of our classes. So, every call has a receptacle ad we organise that.

Anuhea – I was getting the rubbish as a way to help the animals.

Minnie – It was satisfying getting the rubbish that was stuck in bushes and branches.

Emily – Sorting it was good because then we could figure out how much could be recycled.

Jasper – We painted rocks with messages about keeping places tidy and left the for people to find; that was fun.

Don M – We hid our painted rocks where we had found rubbish. When people find them and read them, they’ll stop littering.

Emelia – Someone found a shoe, socks and a rugby ball.

Jai – some people are too lazy to put it in the rubbish bin.

Ariki – Some animals eat the plastic. The sea gulls pick at the rubbish. It goes into their stomachs, and they can starve.

Emily – That plastic comes from oil.

 

ROOM 30 – Miss Marra

This room covered the Lovers Rock area in their clean-up. The children listed what they had found – a stash of cans, a full bottle of wine, old metal fence Waratah, a bottle with an ants nest in it, a padlock, an old food freezer stacked with rubbish several bags of dog poo in a tree; all the same bags, left by one person putting them there regularly, a dead bird in a plastic bag;

Comments from the children about the project

There was just more rubbish than I thought.

People can’t be bothered and don’t want to use their pockets.

Some don’t care where they put stuff.

You know, some ends up in the ocean.

People don’t realise how much pollution they are causing.

A family might just want to get home.

 

ROOM M5 – Mrs Rebecca Berry

This classroom started with the word RESPECT and explored its meaning in many dimensions – what if feels like, what it sounds like, what it looks like.

They started with the way we show respect for others – all ages ad developed the transference of this understanding to the respect for the environment.

We had to figure out what we wanted to make and then we wen through the rubbish to choose what we needed.

“We had to draw our concept first and refine it int a design,” says Rebecca their teacher. One of the boys, Cooper, made a rocket, using an empty lemonade bottle, a twist of paper and some very good timing.

Their class project was formidable.

This class had an ironing board and a sewing machine at the back for of their classroom. The students had used both to make their recycled carry bags – compressing pieces of plastic rubbish under wax paper with the iron (some of the plastic melts or disintegrates, melding all parts into a hardy sheet), then sewing the sheets to make a bag – easier said than done. All the steps they devised were set out clearly, making things as easy as possible.

The Informer was so impressed that we purchased one for carrying our newspapers when filling the newsstands in the street.

 

Editor’s note: I visited four classrooms. I wanted to stay longer with each one. I have always measured happiness by the level of their engagement, the way they relate toon another, their wanting to listen and to participate. These children were bursting with goodwill and information. The teachers are doing a great work. Congratulations! And to be sure, there are parents putting a lot of effort and love into their children’s hearts and minds to assist their education. The Informer was grateful to Marie Bevan for the invitation to share in the results of the term project of the Year Three – Four classes at MBAS – Primary School age group.