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Daffodil Day Friday, 25 August

Every year, thousands of New Zealanders get involved in Daffodil Day to support the Cancer Society’s work and raise awareness. Many communities on the Coromandel Peninsula will be out there on Friday, 25 August

Thames Community Cancer Support Inc

Tairua Ladies NZ Breast Cancer Foundation

Mercury Bay Cancer Support Trust works tirelessly through its Bookshop in Black Smith Lane raising funds for its community support van. Early In August, the van for transport palliative care cancer patients and their equipment needs finally arrived. Alistair Grey from AHG Engineering delivered the van with ramp and inside modifications installed – all these modifications were made free of charge.

 

In every town on the Coromandel there will be daffodils for sale. All the monies raised go to cancer awareness and research. This is a nationally organised day to assist cancer patients all around the country. Whenever one person with cancer is helped in some way, the ripple effect benefits cancer sufferers elsewhere and inspires people in other places to get involved in caring.

 

Th following story describing a project undertaken by St Andrew’s Op shop demonstrates that.

 

Church Op shop donation ‘outside the square’

By Dorothy Preece

St Andrew’s Church Op shop now has its name on a door in the Lions Cancer Lodge in Hamilton.

Earlier this year, the Op shop donated $5,000 to sponsor a room in the Lodge.

Op shop Manager Madeleine Saunders said the donation was unusual, in that it was given to a cause outside of the local community. “As a rule, our donations go exclusively to non-profit initiatives in Mercury Bay,” Madeleine said. “Our Op shop Constitution states that our donations will be for local community benefit, but as we are all painfully aware, many families have cause to stay at the Cancer Lodge while people are undergoing treatment, and so our committee felt that this would benefit the people of Mercury Bay.”

The Church Op shop donates around $50,000 to local churches community groups each year. Other donations this year have included $1,000 each to buy new equipment for the Skate School and Mercury Bay Swim Club, and over $1200 to the Mercury Bay Community Patrol for insurance of its three vehicles.

“The support we get from this community is amazing,” Madeleine said, “and we do encourage local groups to apply for help with their community projects.”

 

Caption: Alistair Grey delivers the Mercury Bay Cancer Support Van with all its extra modifications

 |  The Informer  | 

Every year, thousands of New Zealanders get involved in Daffodil Day to support the Cancer Society’s work and raise awareness. Many communities on the Coromandel Peninsula will be out there on Friday, 25 August

Thames Community Cancer Support Inc

Tairua Ladies NZ Breast Cancer Foundation

Mercury Bay Cancer Support Trust works tirelessly through its Bookshop in Black Smith Lane raising funds for its community support van. Early In August, the van for transport palliative care cancer patients and their equipment needs finally arrived. Alistair Grey from AHG Engineering delivered the van with ramp and inside modifications installed – all these modifications were made free of charge.

 

In every town on the Coromandel there will be daffodils for sale. All the monies raised go to cancer awareness and research. This is a nationally organised day to assist cancer patients all around the country. Whenever one person with cancer is helped in some way, the ripple effect benefits cancer sufferers elsewhere and inspires people in other places to get involved in caring.

 

Th following story describing a project undertaken by St Andrew’s Op shop demonstrates that.

 

Church Op shop donation ‘outside the square’

By Dorothy Preece

St Andrew’s Church Op shop now has its name on a door in the Lions Cancer Lodge in Hamilton.

Earlier this year, the Op shop donated $5,000 to sponsor a room in the Lodge.

Op shop Manager Madeleine Saunders said the donation was unusual, in that it was given to a cause outside of the local community. “As a rule, our donations go exclusively to non-profit initiatives in Mercury Bay,” Madeleine said. “Our Op shop Constitution states that our donations will be for local community benefit, but as we are all painfully aware, many families have cause to stay at the Cancer Lodge while people are undergoing treatment, and so our committee felt that this would benefit the people of Mercury Bay.”

The Church Op shop donates around $50,000 to local churches community groups each year. Other donations this year have included $1,000 each to buy new equipment for the Skate School and Mercury Bay Swim Club, and over $1200 to the Mercury Bay Community Patrol for insurance of its three vehicles.

“The support we get from this community is amazing,” Madeleine said, “and we do encourage local groups to apply for help with their community projects.”

 

Caption: Alistair Grey delivers the Mercury Bay Cancer Support Van with all its extra modifications