Skip to main content

Author: Trevor Ammundsen

Reasons to be cheerful Part 1

I know some people like trains and think they can be effective in the modern day. These people are generally socialists and, like trains, belong in the 19th century. Every dog has its day and for trains, those days are in our distant past. The same can be said of socialists but you can still hear their yapping unfortunately. A week or two ago, Auckland trains had to be stopped as the air temperature was 25 degrees. The Rail people claimed that the tracks were in danger at this high temperature. A tad over cautious I felt as the melting point of steel is about 1450 degrees, so there was quite...

Continue reading

Council Structure – another proficient way of working

Buddy’s letter was written well and laid out his points without resorting to the “shoot the messenger” rubbish on which many unfortunately rely. There were elements to Buddy’s letter with which I disagreed, but there was one point he made that got me thinking and is the basis of this article. I will repeat the point he made so you know to what what I am referring. Regarding Maori Wards, Buddy wrote “What they do is address an inequality in representation and a voice that might require appropriate or specialist knowledge. For example, for best advice we might look to a Councillor with a Farming...

Continue reading

Let’s hope we can be great again

We, like many, entertained waves of family visitors over the Christmas and New Year period. We were pleased to see them enjoy the beach and the various attractions Whitianga has to offer. In January we were pleased to see them go but look forward to them returning. This is one of life’s paradoxes. We hired one of the tour operators to take us and various Kids and Grandies out on the bay for a look at the coast and of course Cathedral Cove. An extremely enjoyable tour that was enjoyed by all. What amazed me though was the amount of people that were visiting Cathedral Cove, there were hundreds,...

Continue reading

Together forever – a good idea

Eventually I found the plan. It is in sections with headings such as, “Our People” and “Our Environment”. Upon reading the plan, one item came up in the section headed, “Our Iwi told us what they would like to improve.” There were various items in this section, but what grabbed my attention was one that stated, “We would like a Maori area set aside at the Kaimarama Cemetery.” While some may be against this, I feel it is actually a good idea and that other ethnic groups should also be given this opportunity. My reasoning is based upon two influences, the first being a trip my good lady and myself...

Continue reading

Beauty in Blocks and Stone Walls

We went out for lunch the other day to the new restaurant, Basker, by The Waterways in Whitianga; one of the great new additions to our hospitality venues that have sprung up in the last few months. We arrived at the time they were closing the brunch menu and preparing for lunch and dinner, so we had to patiently drink some bubbles while waiting for the kitchen to prepare. We were onto the third glass when I started gazing at the scene outside and thinking about the practical beauty that was presented. The view outside is dominated by a canal, winding through elegant suburbs and offering...

Continue reading

Time to Join the Nuclear World?

In the sixties, we teenagers were kept petrified by the thought of the nuclear doom coming down on us. The threat of nuclear war and the resultant nuclear winter with (you guessed it) nuclear snow, had us quivering with fear. This fear was accentuated by movies such as The War Game that were circulated around schools to prove to us all that we had no real future. To us at this time, ‘nuclear ruin’ was our big enemy, in the same way ‘climate ruin’ is to today’s teens. It is hard for teenagers to fight adult publicity machines.   So, we yelled and screamed, protested in the streets...

Continue reading

THE NEW BRIDGE – NOW OPEN – Wednesday 20 December

It was a 6.30am start from Whitianga, followed by a skip through the Tapu Road from Coroglen, a sausage roll provided graciously by the Informer for breakfast, and we were at the assigned meeting place in Kopu. We were organized into our appropriate safety gear of high viz, meteor resistant helmets and goggles and then formally greeted. The formal greeting was given by a nice young chap (Health and Safety Site Director), featuring about ten languages but not English. When he stopped and smiled at us, everybody said a word in response, so I nodded. “Any questions?” he asked. I felt...

Continue reading